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Showing posts from November, 2010

Second Sunday,Lent,.C.March 11,01.Lk.(:28-36

2nd Sunday of Lent, C, Mar.11, 2001(Lk: 9:28-36)Years ago I had a chance to visit the foothills of the Himalayas with a few priest-friends of mine. There was a particular spot at the foothills where tourists would arrive around 2.30 am to see the morning rays of the sun fall on Mount Everest. We too went over there to see that magnificent spectacle of the Mount Everest becoming radiant and resplendent in the morning rays of the sun. It is a sight of such spectacular beauty that one would have to borrow the lines of the poet Wordsworth to describe its splendor: “a presence that disturbs one with joy of elevated thoughts and a sense of something far more deeply interfused.” It was in a way a daily enactment of the nature’s transfiguration in beauty and splendor.Today as we listen to the words of the Gospel we find how the Apostles have come face to face with a beauty whose majesty and splendor no poet could describe. It is Jesus Transfigured in the glory of his divinity, an e…

Second Sunday Easter.C.April22,01.Jn.20:19-31

2nd Sunday of Easter,Apr.22,C,01Jn.20:19-31On this Second Sunday of Easter, we are gathered here once again to experience the joy of the resurrection and to relive in our lives the wonderful experiences the apostles and the disciples went through in those post-resurrection weeks. We find the apostles and disciples in the weeks after the crucifixion and death of Jesus, a frightened group, unable to pursue their jobs, or to mingle with their own country men. All the dreams of sharing the honor and glory with Jesus in the new kingdom have vanished; the crowds have disappeared; no more cures of sicknesses, or the dead being brought back to life. The lines of people asking for a meeting with Jesus have gone. It is into this dispirited group of people that Jesus makes his entrance in his new risen life. Jesus wants to inspire them, to strengthen them and to drive away fear from their hearts. Jesus stands before them all of sudden in that room where they gathered in seclusion, havi…

Second Sunday ,Advent,A.Mt.3:1-12

2nd Sunday of advent-’99Mt.3:1-12As we listen to the readings in today’s Scriptures, the figure that looms large in our mind’s horizon is that of John the Baptist. He is one of the towering personalities in the New Testament, fearless, commanding and willing to face any power or authority to witness to Truth, but humble enough to accept that he has only a minor role to play. The words of the prophet in all their symbolic meanings and nuances sum up the personality and character of John the Baptist.The prophet speaks to a people who were heart-broken and confused because of their harsh experiences in exile. Conquered by Babylon, deprived of all their proud possessions, cut off from their God because of their past actions of disloyalty and faithlessness, the people of Israel were in total grief. God feels pity for themandoffers them signs of hope, words of healing and the strength of his imminent protection.God asks the prophet to comfort the people , allay their fears and st…

Second Sunday,Easter A,April 7,02.Jn.20:19-31

2ndSund.Easter,April7,02,AThese are the days in which we hear from the Gospel readings the impact the Resurrection of our Lord produced on the apostles and the disciples. The first reading from the Acts of the Apostles gives us a vivid account of the activities of the first community of the followers of Jesus. In a few words, the Evangelist describesthe way they lived: “they devoted among themselves to the teaching of the apostles and to the communal life, to the breaking of bread and to the prayers.” It was a life of prayer, of sharing and of participation in the Eucharistic service.” From that small community, we have grown into an unbelievably large community spread through out the world, spanning over centuries. But the vision for the life for a Christian remainsthe same: sharing, prayers, and the participation in the Eucharist.The reading from today’s Gospel describes vividly the transformation that has happened in the lives of the Apostles through the revelations Jesu…

Second Sunday,A.Jan.20,02.Jn.1:29-34

2nd Sund.A,Jan.20,’02All the readings of today continue to expand themeaning of the epiphany that we celebrateda few days ago. The words of the Prophet Isaiah as well as John the Baptist make us go deeper into the nature and role of the Messiah.The Redemptive role of Jesus is very powerfully brought out in the words of John the Baptist. Declining any special role for himself, John the Baptist points to Jesus as “ the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.”The Lamb of God is an image replete with several meanings for the audience of John the Baptist. In the Genesis, we find Abel offering a lamb as a sacrifice for sins. Later Isaac asks Abraham:” where is the lamb?” Abraham answers;” God will provide himself with a young beast for a sacrifice, my son.” In the Book of Leviticus, there is the mention of a scapegoat that carries the sins of the people into the desert. According to the Leviticus, Aaron after placing both hands on the goat’s head confesses all the sinful…

2nd S.Ordinary, Jan.16,2000

1Sm.3:3-10; Jn.1:35-42


St.Augustine in his Confessions speaks of the some of the most agonizing moments in his life when he felt very restless and heart-broken not knowing where to turn for strength and comfort. He cries out “How long, how long Lord, wilt Thou be angry with me”. All of a sudden he hears this voice: “ Take up and read: Take up and read.” He took the Bible and read it and Augustine says: “All of a sudden, a light pervaded my soul and all the darkness of doubt vanished away.”All the readings in today’s Scriptures describe to us the changes that happened in the lives of the prophets of the past because of the call they have received from God. In the first reading, we find Samuel, hearing the voice of God calling him to a special vocation, to be a prophet. He hears the voice and runs to his prophet-master, saying,”Here I am”. But later, he realizes that it was not the prophet who called him, but it was God who was calling him. He responds to God: “Speak, for your …

First S. of Advent,Nov.28,10

Advent, 1 St S,Nov.28,10(Lk.1:5-25)


Today marks the beginning of the liturgical season of Advent. The readings that we heard just now from the Scriptures prepare us for this beautiful period of expectations and waiting. The waiting is for the celebration of Christmas, for the birth of Jesus, for a day stamped in our memory with great feelings of joy and peace, of forgiveness and reconciliation, and of goodness and generosity. The period of Advent offers us an opportunity to reflect on the unbounded love of God , our Father, who has loved us so much as to send His son to die for us and to reclaim for us the right to be called the children of God.

The reading from the Gospel describes the events that make this period of Advent significant and glorious. There is no other better preparation for Christmas than to reflect on the life and teachings of the John the Baptist who was the forerunner of Jesus Christ, our Savior. John the Baptist stands at the door of the season of Advent …

Advent,Second Sun.C.,Dec.2000

Addressing the Bishops of the United States, the late Archbishop of Chicago, CardinalBernardin once said: “Catholics cannot evangelize the eighty million unchurched in the United states when so many Catholics themselves have yet to experience conversion.”Often we think of ourselves as good Christians, but when we examine our lives we find that we are far, far away from the way of life Jesus wants us to follow. Our arrogance, our selfishness, our uncharitable attitudes etc make us unchristian and often in human. Can we remain in that state of mind and call ourselves Christians? No, we cannot. Our vocation as Christians demands an ongoing conversion in our lives, a turning towards Jesus, and a turning away from the path of selfishness and sins.That is why at the beginning of the Advent season, as we prepare ourselves for the celebration of the birth of Jesus, the Church presents before us the august figure of John the Baptist, the last Prophet of the Old testament and the fi…

Advent,SecondSun.A,,Dec.9,01

During this season of Advent, as we prepare to renew in our memory the birth of our Savior, we know we are in the midst of a painful period of our time when thousands of our people are in grief because of what has happened to them in the recent tragedies. As wars still continue, and as lives are being lost, mourning and weeping continue in our land and in other places.It is in the midst of these feelings of grief and shock that we hear one of the great of prophets speaking to us about a time when the whole universe is dancing with joy because of the arrival of a new kingdom, of a new leader. Isaiah was speaking at a time when the people of his time were experiencing great shock and fear because of the invading forces of the Assyrian emperor who came to the borders of Israel. We know those words of the prophet were a telescopic vision of the times that would come with Jesus. Jesus offered that vision thousands of years later to the people of Israel and to the whole world: …